I give unto you...
Church: So it is a sword. Just happens to function like a key in very specific situations.
Caboose: Or it's a key all the time, and when you stick it in people, it unlocks their death.
Church: God damn, man, I would love to live in your world for about ten minutes.
Some days in late August at home are like this, the air thin and eager like this, with something in it sad and nostalgic and familiar…
ladytrenchcoat:

keyblade-crafter:

2spookyvoux:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t picture the original leg. This is fucking amazing.

I thought it was real until i saw the paintbrush and read the comment

Holy crap!

ladytrenchcoat:

keyblade-crafter:

2spookyvoux:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t picture the original leg. This is fucking amazing.

I thought it was real until i saw the paintbrush and read the comment

Holy crap!

cowboycliche:

One of my favorite twitter exchanges

cowboycliche:

One of my favorite twitter exchanges

rsl-fanpage:

Robert Sean Leonard on Hugh Laurie:

“As we know, I’m straight, but yeah, it’s like, homina homina homina.”

sisterofthewolves:

By Ronny Brams

sisterofthewolves:

By Ronny Brams

adinasauce:

sizvideos:

TL;DR : Watch this incredible story in video

so basically leopard seals ARE cats??


The hunter’s moon, also known as the sanguine moon, is the first full moon following the harvest moon (the full moon nearest the autumnal equinox). Here the moonlight illuminates ice crystals in the upper atmosphere to give a rainbow halo effect around the moon. This is called a lunar corona

The hunter’s moon, also known as the sanguine moon, is the first full moon following the harvest moon (the full moon nearest the autumnal equinox). Here the moonlight illuminates ice crystals in the upper atmosphere to give a rainbow halo effect around the moon. This is called a lunar corona

wadniewsti:

buster the feminist

bogleech:

shezzainblue:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.
Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.
Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.
City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.
This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.
How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

This is amazing. 

People have been saying for years that outright giving away homes to the homeless would actually save money in the long run but I had no idea ANYWHERE in America had the balls to try it.
Also props to those Churches who were told to stop feeding homeless people and said (in a more Church-friendly way, I’m assuming) fuck the police.

bogleech:

shezzainblue:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.

Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.

Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.

City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.

Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.

Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.

Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.

This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.

How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

This is amazing. 

People have been saying for years that outright giving away homes to the homeless would actually save money in the long run but I had no idea ANYWHERE in America had the balls to try it.

Also props to those Churches who were told to stop feeding homeless people and said (in a more Church-friendly way, I’m assuming) fuck the police.

far-2geeky:

Growing up I always thought pints were massive. Like the size of your head big. But I now realize that hobbits are just very small.

chocolateinthelibrary:

So my family stayed at my aunt’s beach house last weekend and

image

there

image

is

image

literally

image

a Harry Potter-themed

image

reading nook

image

in the cupboard under the stairs

Shingeki no Kyojin: Military Divisions

generalelectric:

GE scientists are developing superhydrophobic surfaces to keep ice off of aviation equipment and wind turbines. The Slow Mo Guys captured this footage with their Phantom Flex camera on a recent trip to GE Global Research.